the poetry of Cynthia Jobin

To those of you who loved Cynthia Jobin’s poetry and miss her extraordinary voice – a cause for celebration.

Poetry from John Looker

Cynthia Jobin, who died nearly two years ago, wrote some deeply moving and thoughtful verse. The independent publisher Bennison Books has now published a posthumous volume of her poetry. I’m pleased to give space on my blog to the following post from them.

Guest post from Bennison Books

Readers of John’s blog may already be familiar with the New England poet Cynthia Jobin, whose poetry attracted many followers worldwide. Admirers of her work will be delighted to learn that a collection of her poetry, Song of Paper,has just been published by Bennison Books.

SongOfPaperAmazon.com(https://amzn.to/2A8Pq3d)

Amazon UK(https://amzn.to/2NFTF9M)

Shortly before her death in late 2016, Cynthia entrusted her poetic legacy to John and Bennison Books welcomed the opportunity to work with him in producing this posthumous collection of her poetry. John also wrote the introduction to Song of Paper, an excerpt from which appears below.

Excerpt from…

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19 thoughts on “the poetry of Cynthia Jobin

    • Thanks for posting this. I don’t know that Sugano was ever on the same bit of railroad at the same time as my father. The image I used that Sugano took was courtesy of the Thai-Burma Railway Museum. When my book was nearing publication, I read a memoir in which Sugano was mentioned committing an atrocity with a train, I almost pulled the photo of the train on the Wampo Viaduct after reading it. He was a railway and photography enthusiast and his photos are a useful record – but not a nice guy.

  1. Thank you Hilary for bringing this to my attention. Cynthia Jobin was one of the blogs I used to follow and enjoy. She had a strong voice. Wonderful to see her poetry won’t be forgotten in this publication.

  2. Do you have an ISBN for her book, so I might locate it from Book Depository? I can still hear her wonderful voice, reading her poems. We all still miss her, I think.

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